Dr Martin Luther King Jr. The Human Rights Dream murdered by American Masons and their minions

Martin Luther King Jr – The Man and the Dream a martyr for Human Rights.  Several years later his mother was also murdered at her church while playing the piano during church service by another black man —most likely a service man a black man controlled by wizardry.

Martin-Luther-King-Jr as student in college

Martin Luther King Jr  is a man I respect, for many reasons.  A man who gave his life so Blacks of his generation would have hope and better civil rights.  So powerful a statesmen he was, he was a target just like Malcom X but more dangerous to the white power structure.

He stands head and shoulders over any black athlete or leader  that you might like better for the wrong reasons or the right reasons.  His children mistakenly supported an illegal alien for president not thinking how great their Father was and no comparison to the man that was executed along side former president George Bush Jr. in 2011 for mass murder of Americans and International citizens.

Had Martin Luther King Jr’s Children known the truth about Ba’rak Hussein they would not have given no support to him.

By God’s Grace did Dr King’s the dream and prophecy come true for the whole world by the Angelcraft foundation for education in partnership with God’s Holy Spirit though it took a mighty judgment.

Principe Jose Maria Chavira MS Adagio I – Divine Name JV AGNVS DEI VERBVM DEI Prince Jose Maria Chavira Adagio Al Hussayni AGA KHAN V PRIMOGENITVS FILVS  HOMINIS SPIRITVS NOME DE PLUME JCANGELCRAFT


 

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This conflict continued until I studied a course in Bible in which I came to see that behind the legends and myths of the Book were many profound truths which one could not escape. Two men- Dr. Mays, president of Morehouse College and one of the great influences in my life, and Dr. George Kelsey, a professor of philosophy and religion-made me stop and think. Both were ministers, both deeply religious, and yet both were learned men, aware of all the trends of modern thinking. I could see in their lives the ideal of what I wanted a minister to be.

It was in my senior year of college that I entered the ministry. I had felt the urge to enter the ministry from my high school days, but accumulated doubts had somewhat blocked the urge. Now it appeared again with an inescapable drive. I felt a sense of responsibility which I could not escape.

I guess the influence of my father had a great deal to do with my going into the ministry. This is not to say that he ever spoke to me in terms of being a minister but that my admiration for him was the great moving factor. He set forth a noble example that I didn’t mind following. I still feel the effects of the noble moral and ethical ideals that I grew up under. They have been real and precious to me, and even in moments of theological doubt I could never turn away from them.

At the age of nineteen I finished college and was ready to enter seminary.

For more of the Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr see http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/kingpapers/article/the_autobiography_of_martin_luther_king_jr_contents/ Christianity and Islam are religions of peace.

ABN Freedom of Speech A.M. with you always

Dr Martin Luther King PHd Jr Autobiography

I was born in the late twenties on the verge of the Great Depression, which was to spread its disastrous arms into every corner of this nation for over a decade. I was much too young to remember the beginning of this depression, but I do recall, when I was about five years of age, how I questioned my parents about the numerous people standing in breadlines. I can see the effects of this early childhood experience on my present anticapitalistic feelings.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1962 Speech in NYC

My birthplace was Atlanta, Georgia, the capital of the state and the so-called “gateway to the South.” Atlanta is home for me. I was born on Auburn Avenue. Our church, Ebenezer Baptist, is on Auburn Avenue. I’m now co-pastor of that church, and my office in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference is on Auburn Avenue.Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr 6 as a child

 

I went through the public schools of Atlanta for a period, and then I went to what was then known as the Atlanta University Laboratory High School for two years. After that school closed, I went to Booker T. Washington High School.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr-Booker-T Washington High School

The community in which I was born was quite ordinary in terms of social status. No one in our community had attained any great wealth. Most of the Negroes in my hometown who had attained wealth lived in a section of town known as “Hunter Hills.” The community was characterized with a sort of unsophisticated simplicity. No one was in the extremely poor class.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr - Hunter Street Hunter Hills-community

It is probably fair to class the people of this community as those of average income. It was a wholesome community, notwithstanding the fact that none of us were ever considered members of the “upper-upper class.” Crime was at a minimum, and most of our neighbors were deeply religious.

From the very beginning I was an extraordinarily healthy child. It is said that at my birth the doctors pronounced me a one hundred percent perfect child, from a physical point of view. I hardly know how an ill moment feels. I guess the same thing would apply to my mental life. I have always been somewhat precocious, both physically and mentally. So it seems that from a hereditary point of view, nature was very kind to me.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr 2

Martin Luther King Jr Documentary

My home situation was very congenial. I have a marvelous mother and father. I can hardly remember a time that they ever argued (my father happens to be the kind who just won’t argue) or had any great falling out. These factors were highly significant in determining my religious attitudes.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr photograph-of-mother-and-father

It is quite easy for me to think of a God of love mainly because I grew up in a family where love was central and where lovely relationships were ever-present. It is quite easy for me to think of the universe as basically friendly mainly because of my uplifting hereditary and environmental circumstances. It is quite easy for me to lean more toward optimism than pessimism about human nature mainly because of my childhood experiences.

New Glory %22Freedom and Peace%22 the Bill of Rights Flag of the New Kingdom and Soveriegnty of the United States of America's Latte Dei Saints

In my own life and in the life of a person who is seeking to be strong, you combine in your character antitheses strongly marked. You are both militant and moderate; you are both idealistic and realistic. And I think that my strong determination for justice comes from the very strong, dynamic personality of my father, and I would hope that the gentle aspect comes from a mother who is very gentle and sweet.

“Mother Dear”

My mother, Alberta Williams King, has been behind the scene setting forth those motherly cares, the lack of which leaves a missing link in life. She is a very devout person with a deep commitment to the Christian faith. Unlike my father, she is soft-spoken and easygoing. Although possessed of a rather recessive personality, she is warm and easily approachable.

Coretta Scott King, second from right, wife of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., prepares to board a Pan Am Clipper, Dec. 5, 1964, at Kennedy Airport in New York, en route to London to meet Dr. King, who was to receive a Nobel Peace Prize on Dec. 10. With Mrs. King are Dr. King's parents, Martin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King, and at right is Christine Farris, Dr. King's sister. (AP Photo)
Coretta Scott King, second from right, wife of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., prepares to board a Pan Am Clipper, Dec. 5, 1964, at Kennedy Airport in New York, en route to London to meet Dr. King, who was to receive a Nobel Peace Prize on Dec. 10. With Mrs. King are Dr. King’s parents, Martin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King, and at right is Christine Farris, Dr. King’s sister. (AP Photo)

The daughter of A. D. Williams, a successful minister, Alberta Williams grew up in comparative comfort. She was sent to the best available schools and college and was, in general, protected from the worst blights of discrimination. An only child, she was provided with all of the conveniences that any high school and college student could expect. In spite of her relatively comfortable circumstances, my mother never complacently adjusted herself to the system of segregation. She instilled a sense of self-respect in all of her children from the very beginning.

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My mother confronted the age-old problem of the Negro parent in America: how to explain discrimination and segregation to a small child. She taught me that I should feel a sense of “somebodiness” but that on the other hand I had to go out and face a system that stared me in the face every day saying you are “less than,” you are “not equal to.”

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr -mother-and-wife

She told me about slavery and how it ended with the Civil War. She tried to explain the divided system of the South—the segregated schools, restaurants, theaters, housing; the white and colored signs on drinking fountains, waiting rooms, lavatories—as a social condition rather than a natural order.

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She made it clear that she opposed this system and that I must never allow it to make me feel inferior. Then she said the words that almost every Negro and immigrants sometimes here before they can yet understand the injustice that makes them necessary: “You are as good as anyone.” At this time Mother had no idea that the little boy in her arms would years later be involved in a struggle against the system she was speaking of.

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Chapter 2: Morehouse College

My call to the ministry was not a miraculous or supernatural something. On the contrary it was an inner urge calling me to serve humanity.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr University-photograph

At the age of fifteen, I entered Morehouse College. My father and my maternal grandfather had also attended, so Morehouse has had three generations of Kings.

I shall never forget the hardships that I had upon entering college, for though I had been one of the top students in high school, I was still reading at only an eighth-grade level. I went to college from the eleventh grade. I never went to the twelfth grade, and skipped another grade earlier, so I was a pretty young fellow at Morehouse.

My days in college were very exciting ones. There was a free atmosphere at Morehouse, and it was there I had my first frank discussion on race. The professors were not caught up in the clutches of state funds and could teach what they wanted with academic freedom. They encouraged us in a positive quest for a solution to racial ills. I realized that nobody there was afraid. Important people came in to discuss the race problem rationally with us.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News -Dr Martin Luther King Jr Peace March pictures-from-the-60s-and-70s-peace-march

When I went to Morehouse as a freshman in 1944, my concern for racial and economic justice was already substantial. During my student days I read Henry David Thoreau’s essay “On Civil Disobedience” for the first time. Here, in this courageous New Englander’s refusal to pay his taxes and his choice of jail rather than support a war that would spread slavery’s territory into Mexico, I made my first contact with the theory of nonviolent resistance. Fascinated by the idea of refusing to cooperate with an evil system, I was so deeply moved that I reread the work several times.

I became convinced that noncooperative with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. No other person has been more eloquent and passionate in getting this idea across than Henry David Thoreau. As a result of his writings and personal witness, we are the heirs of a legacy of creative protest. The teachings of Thoreau came alive in our civil rights movement; indeed, they are more alive than ever before. Whether expressed in a sit-in at lunch counters, a freedom ride into Mississippi, a peaceful protest in Albany, Georgia, a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, these are outgrowths of Thoreau’s insistence that evil must be resisted and that no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice.

UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1970: Photo of Martin Luther King Jr Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
UNSPECIFIED – CIRCA 1970: Photo of Martin Luther King Jr Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

As soon as I entered college, I started working with the organizations that were trying to make racial justice a reality. The wholesome relations we had in the Intercollegiate Council convinced me that we had many white persons as allies, particularly among the younger generation. I had been ready to resent the whole white race, but as I got to see more of white people, my resentment was softened, and a spirit of cooperation took its place. I was at the point where I was deeply interested in political matters and social ills. I could envision myself playing a part in breaking down the legal barriers to Negro rights.

“An inner urge calling me to serve society”

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - The-Angelcraft Foundation-for Education-in-association-with-the-YHWH foundation-1
By God’s Grace Dr King your dream and prophecy has come true for the whole world as you would have like it. The JC Angelcraft foundation is a partnership powered by God’ tender, mercy, justice and tender Love. Your dream again has come true and your enemy and the enemy of the public around the wold has been vanquished. Let freedom reign let freedom reign. -Jose Maria Chavira MS

Because of the influence of my mother and father, I guess I always had a deep urge to serve humanity, but I didn’t start out with an interest to enter the ministry. I thought I could probably do it better as a lawyer or doctor. One of my closest friends at Morehouse, Walter McCall, was clear about his intention of going into the ministry, but I was slow to make up my mind. I did serve as assistant to my father for six months.

As stated above, my college training, especially the first two years, brought many doubts into my mind. It was then that the shackles of fundamentalism were removed from my body. More and more I could see a gap between what I had learned in Sunday school and what I was learning in college. My studies had made me skeptical, and I could not see how many of the facts of science could be squared with religion.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr 1

I revolted, too, against the emotionalism of much Negro religion, the shouting and stamping. I didn’t understand it, and it embarrassed me. I often say that if we, as a people, had as much religion in our hearts and souls as we have in our legs and feet, we could change the world.

I had seen that most Negro ministers were unlettered, not trained in seminaries, and that gave me pause. I had been brought up in the church and knew about religion, but I wondered whether it could serve as a vehicle to modern thinking, whether religion could be intellectually respectable as well as emotionally satisfying.}

commentary by JCANGELCRAFT

  1. When we lose respect for God and irresponsibly manage our world and leave God out of our public schools, we corrupt technology such as nuclear fusion making warheads by the hundreds of thousands and all radio-active elements no longer carry radiation and even dirty bombs fail and neutrinos fail,  we must conclude that we were bad stewards ,
  2. we must conclude that aside from government we have failed God in respect by writing Godless news and very Godless scientific books with laws already existence and some man takes the credit for.
  3. ( Dr King is right good religion God (enlightenment and God the great good scientist) and is foundation upon the compendium of good religion all government, all education and knowledge.  If we recognize all great inventions — less weapons of mass destruction—- and believe in two laws of physics that are constant and one is 1. God is the author of modern science and 2. no laws of physics discovered by humans are laws unless God says they are laws.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News -Haifa Jerusalem -House-of-justice-the-supreme-govern

Continuation Dr Martin Luther King Jr PHd.

This conflict continued until I studied a course in Bible in which I came to see that behind the legends and myths of the Book were many profound truths which one could not escape. Two men- Dr. Mays, president of Morehouse College and one of the great influences in my life, and Dr. George Kelsey, a professor of philosophy and religion-made me stop and think. Both were ministers, both deeply religious, and yet both were learned men, aware of all the trends of modern thinking. I could see in their lives the ideal of what I wanted a minister to be.

Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr 3

It was in my senior year of college that I entered the ministry. I had felt the urge to enter the ministry from my high school days, but accumulated doubts had somewhat blocked the urge. Now it appeared again with an inescapable drive. I felt a sense of responsibility which I could not escape.

I guess the influence of my father had a great deal to do with my going into the ministry. This is not to say that he ever spoke to me in terms of being a minister but that my admiration for him was the great moving factor.Prince Jose Maria Chavira's ABN Freedom of Speech - Activists News - Dr Martin Luther King Jr 2

He set forth a noble example that I didn’t mind following. I still feel the effects of the noble moral and ethical ideals that I grew up under. They have been real and precious to me, and even in moments of theological doubt I could never turn away from them.

At the age of nineteen I finished college and was ready to enter seminary.

For more of the Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr see  http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/kingpapers/article/the_autobiography_of_martin_luther_king_jr_contents/

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